Figure 6: Estimated internal human migration flows between subnational administrative units for every malaria endemic country in Latin America and the Caribbean (Supplementary Table 1). Coordinates for all three panels refer to GCS WGS 1984. For illustrative purposes, subnational unit boundaries are shown only in the insets and the colour ranges used to represent the flows are country-specific (refer to Supplementary Fig. 3 for additional close-up views of internal migration flows in Latin America and Caribbean).

Human mobility continues to increase in terms of volumes and reach, producing growing global connectivity. This connectivity hampers efforts to eliminate infectious diseases such as malaria through reintroductions of pathogens, and thus accounting for it becomes important in designing global, continental, regional, and national strategies. Recent works have shown that census-derived migration data provides a good proxy for internal connectivity, in terms of relative strengths of movement between administrative units, across temporal scales. To support global malaria eradication strategy efforts, here we describe the construction of an open access archive of estimated internal migration flows in endemic countries built through pooling of census microdata. These connectivity datasets, described here along with the approaches and methods used to create and validate them, are available both through the WorldPop website and the WorldPop Dataverse Repository.

Read more here: https://www.nature.com/articles/sdata201666

https://doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2016.66

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Figure 1: Examples of WorldPop datasets. a) Population distribution in 2010 across south America from Sorichetta et al.; b) Population distributions mapped in southern China in 1990 (top) and 2010 (bottom) from Gaughan et al.5; c) Internal migration flow estimates across sub-Saharan Africa from Sorichetta et al.7; d) Stack of geospatial data layers that form a central component to WorldPop population mapping, from Lloyd et al.3

High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions, their characteristics and changes over time are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. WorldPop aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access spatial demographic datasets built using transparent approaches. The Scientific Data WorldPop collection brings together descriptor papers on these datasets and is introduced here.

Read more here: https://www.nature.com/articles/sdata20174#citeas

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WorldPop

WorldPop

WorldPop develops peer-reviewed research and methods for the construction of open and high-resolution geospatial data on population distributions.